KENTUCKY
227.700 “Fireworks” defined — Exceptions.
      As used in KRS 227.700 to 227.750, “fireworks” means any composition or device for the purpose of producing a visible or an audible effect by combustion, deflagration, or detonation, and which meets the definition of “consumer fireworks” as defined in KRS 227.702 or “display” fireworks as defined in KRS 227.706 and as set forth in the United States Department of Transportation’s (DOT) hazardous materials regulations. “Fireworks” does not include:
      (1) Exception number 1: Toy pistols, toy canes, toy guns or other devices in which paper or plastic caps manufactured in accordance with DOT regulations, and packed and shipped according to said regulations, are not considered to be fireworks and shall be allowed to be used and sold at all times.
      (2) Exception number 2: Model rockets and model rocket motors designed, sold, and used for the purpose of propelling recoverable aero models are not considered to be fireworks.
      (3) Exception number 3: Propelling or expelling charges consisting of a mixture of sulfur, charcoal, and saltpeter are not considered as being designed for producing audible effects.
227.702 Consumer fireworks defined.
      As used in KRS 227.700 to 227.750, “consumer fireworks” means fireworks that are suitable for use by the public, designed primarily to produce visible effects by combustion, and that comply with the construction, chemical composition, and labeling regulations of the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission. The types, sizes, and amount of pyrotechnic contents of these devices are limited as enumerated in this section. Some small devices designed to produce audible effects are included, such as whistling devices, ground devices containing fifty (50) mg.
or less of explosive composition, and aerial devices containing one hundred thirty (130) mg. or less of explosive composition. Consumer fireworks are further defined by the Consumer Product Safety Commission in CPSC, 16 C.F.R. pts. 1500 and 1507, are classified as Division 1.4G explosives by the United States Department of
      Transportation, and include the following:
      (1) Ground and hand-held sparkling devices.
      (a) Dipped stick-sparkler or wire sparkler. These devices consist of a metal wire or wood dowel that has been coated with pyrotechnic composition. Upon ignition of the tip of the device, a shower of sparks is produced. Sparklers may contain up to one hundred (100) grams of pyrotechnic composition per item. Those devices containing any perchlorate or chlorate salts may not exceed five (5) grams of pyrotechnic composition per item. Wire sparklers which contain no magnesium and which contain less than one hundred (100) grams of composition per item are not included in this category, in accordance with DOT regulations;
      (b) Cylindrical fountain. Cylindrical tube containing not more than seventy-five (75) grams of pyrotechnic composition. Upon ignition, a shower of colored sparks, and sometimes a whistling effect or smoke, is produced. This device may be provided with a spike for insertion into the ground (spike fountain), a wood or plastic base for placing on the ground (base fountain), or a wood or cardboard handle, if intended to be hand-held (handle fountain). When more than one (1) tube is mounted on a common base, total pyrotechnic composition may not exceed two hundred (200) grams, or five hundred (500) grams if the tubes are separated from each other on the base by a distance of at least one-half (1/2) inch;
      (c) Cone fountain. Cardboard or heavy paper cone containing up to fifty (50) grams of pyrotechnic composition. The effect is the same as that of a cylindrical fountain. When more than one (1) cone is mounted on a common base, the total pyrotechnic composition may not exceed two hundred (200) grams, or five hundred (500) grams if the tubes are separated from each other on the base by a distance of at least one-half (1/2) inch;
      (d) Illuminating torch. Cylindrical tube containing up to one hundred (100) grams of pyrotechnic composition. Upon ignition, colored fire is produced. May be spike, base or hand-held. When more than one (1) tube is mounted on a common base, total pyrotechnic composition may not exceed two hundred
(200) grams, or five hundred (500) grams if the tubes are separated from each other on the base by a distance of at least one-half (1/2) inch;
      (e) Wheel. A device attached to a post or tree by means of a nail or string. A wheel may have one (1) or more drivers, each of which may contain not more than sixty (60) grams of pyrotechnic composition. No wheel may contain more than two hundred (200) grams total pyrotechnic composition. Upon ignition, the wheel revolves, producing a shower of color and sparks and, sometimes, a whistling effect;
      (f) Ground spinner. Small device containing not more than twenty (20) grams of pyrotechnic composition, similar in operation to a wheel but intended to be placed on the ground and ignited. A shower of sparks and color is produced by the rapidly spinning device;
      (g) Flitter sparkler. Narrow paper tube attached to a stick or wire and filled with not more than one hundred (100) grams of pyrotechnic composition that produces color and sparks upon ignition. The paper at one (1) end of the tube is ignited to make the device function; and
      (h) Toy smoke device. Small plastic or paper item containing not more than one hundred (100) grams of pyrotechnic composition that, upon ignition, produces white or colored smoke as the primary effect;
      (2) Aerial devices.
      (a) Sky rockets and bottle rockets. Cylindrical tube containing not more than twenty (20) grams of pyrotechnic composition. Sky rockets contain a wooden stick for guidance and stability and rise into the air upon ignition. A burst of color or noise or both is produced at the height of flight;
      (b) Missile-type rocket. A device similar to a sky rocket in size, composition, and effect that uses fins rather than a stick for guidance and stability;
      (c) Helicopter, aerial spinner. A tube containing up to twenty (20) grams of pyrotechnic composition. A propeller or blade is attached, which, upon ignition, lifts the rapidly spinning device into the air. A visible or audible effect is produced at the height of flight;
      (d) Roman candles. Heavy paper or cardboard tube containing up to twenty (20) grams of pyrotechnic composition. Upon ignition, up to ten (10) “stars” (pellets of pressed pyrotechnic composition that burn with bright color) are individually expelled at several second intervals;
      (e) Mine, shell. Heavy cardboard or paper tube usually attached to a wood or plastic base and containing up to sixty (60) grams of total chemical composition (lift charge, burst charge, and visible or audible effect composition). Upon ignition, “stars,” components producing reports containing up to one hundred thirty (130) milligrams of explosive composition per report, or other devices are propelled into the air. The term “mine” refers to a device with no internal components containing a bursting charge, and the term “shell” refers to a device that propels a component that subsequently bursts open in the air. A mine or shell device may contain more than one (1) tube provided the tubes fire in sequence upon ignition of one (1) external fuse. The term “cake” refers to a dense-packed collection of mine or shell tubes. Total chemical composition including lift charges of any multiple tube devices may not exceed two hundred (200) grams. The maximum quantity of lift charge in any one (1) tube of a mine or shell device shall not exceed twenty (20) grams, and the maximum quantity of break or bursting charge in any component shall not exceed twenty-five percent (25%) of the total weight of chemical composition in the component. The tube remains on the ground; and
      (f) Aerial shell kit, reloadable tube. A package kit containing a cardboard, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), or equivalent launching tube with multiple-shot aerial shells. Each aerial shell is limited to a maximum of sixty (60) grams of total chemical composition (lift charge, burst charge, and visible or audible effect composition), and the maximum diameter of each shell shall not exceed one and three-fourths (1-3/4) inches. In addition, the maximum quantity of lift charge in any shell shall not exceed twenty (20) grams, and the maximum quantity of break or bursting charge in any shell shall not exceed twenty- five percent (25%) of the total weight of chemical
composition in the shell. The total chemical composition of all the shells in a kit, including lift charge, shall not exceed four hundred (400) grams. The user lowers a shell into the launching tube, at the time of firing, with the fuse extending out of the top of the tube. After the firing, the tube is then reloaded with another shell for the next firing. All launching tubes shall be capable of firing twice the number of shells in the kit without failure of the tube. Each
package of multiple-shot aerial shells must comply with all warning label requirements of the Consumer Product Safety Commission; and
      (3) Audible ground devices.
      (a) Firecrackers, salutes. Small paper-wrapped or cardboard tube containing not more than fifty (50) mg. of pyrotechnic composition. Those used in aerial devices may contain not more than one hundred thirty (130) milligrams of explosive composition per report. Upon ignition, noise and a flash of light is produced; and
      (b) Chaser. Small paper or cardboard tube that travels along the ground upon ignition. A whistling effect, or other noise, is often produced. The explosive composition used to create the noise may not exceed fifty (50) mg.
227.704 Novelties and trick noisemakers defined.
      Items listed in this section are classified as novelties and trick noisemakers and are not classified as consumer fireworks by the United States Department of Transportation, and their transportation, storage, retail sale, possession, sale, and use shall be allowed throughout the state at all times.
      (1) Snake, glow worm. Pressed pellet of pyrotechnic composition that produces a large, snake-like ash upon burning. The ash expands in length as the pellet burns. These devices may not contain mercuric thiocyanate.
      (2) Smoke device. Tube or sphere containing pyrotechnic composition that, upon ignition, produces white or colored smoke as the primary effect.
      (3) Wire sparkler. Wire coated with pyrotechnic composition that produces a shower of sparks upon ignition. These items may not contain magnesium and must not exceed one hundred (100) grams of pyrotechnic composition per item. Devices containing any chlorate or perchlorate salts may not exceed five (5) grams of pyrotechnic composition per item.
      (4) Trick noisemaker. Item that produces a small report intended to surprise the user. These devices include:
      (a) Party popper. Small plastic or paper item containing not more than sixteen (16) mg. of explosive composition that is friction sensitive. A string protruding from the device is pulled to ignite it, expelling paper streamers and producing a small report.
      (b) Booby trap. Small tube with string protruding from both ends, similar to a party popper in design. The ends of the string are pulled to ignite the friction sensitive composition, producing a small report.
      (c) Snapper. Small, paper-wrapped item containing a minute quantity of explosive composition coated on small bits of sand. When dropped, the device explodes producing a small report.
      (d) Trick match. Kitchen or book match that has been coated with a small quantity of explosive or pyrotechnic composition. Upon ignition of the match a small report or a shower of sparks is produced.
      (e) Cigarette load. Small wooden peg that has been coated with a small quantity of explosive composition. Upon ignition of a cigarette containing one (1) of the pegs, a small report is produced.
      (f) Auto burglar alarm. Tube which contains pyrotechnic composition that produces a loud whistle or smoke, or both, when ignited. A small quantity of explosive, not exceeding fifty (50) mg. may also be used to produce a small report. A squib is used to ignite the device.
227.708 Legality of items described in KRS 227.702.
      (1) Items described in KRS 227.702 are legal for retail sale provided all applicable federal and state requirements with respect thereto are met.
      (2) Items described in KRS 227.706 are not legal for retail sale but are legal under permits granted pursuant to KRS 227.710 for the purposes specified in this chapter for public displays and may be sold at wholesale as provided in this chapter.
      (3) Items described in KRS 227.704 are legal for retail sale provided all applicable federal and state requirements with respect thereto are met.
227.715 Requirements for sale of certain consumer fireworks.
      Except as provided in KRS 227.710, the consumer fireworks described in KRS 227.702 may be offered for sale, sold at retail, or kept with the intent to sell, only if the following requirements are met:
      (1) Any person, firm, co-partnership, nonprofit, or business intending to sell consumer fireworks described in KRS 227.702(1) shall register annually with the state fire marshal, who may assess a fee of no more than twentyfive dollars ($25) for each site at which fireworks shall be sold. The registration requirement under this section shall
not apply to permanent business establishments which are open year round and in which the sale of fireworks is ancillary to the primary course of business. Each location shall be required to charge sales tax at the current rate imposed on retailers in KRS 139.200;
      (2) Permanent business establishments open year-round and in which the sale of consumer fireworks is ancillary to the primary course of business shall only be permitted to sell those consumer fireworks described in KRS 227.702(1), or shall meet the criteria for “seasonal retailer” described in subsection (3) of this section;
      (3) “Seasonal retailers” shall be defined as any person, firm, co-partnership, nonprofit, or corporation intending to sell “consumer fireworks” between June 10 and July 7, or December 26 and January 4 of each year or both, and shall include permanent businesses, temporary businesses, stores, stands, or tents. A seasonal retailer shall register with the state fire marshal, who may assess a fee of no more than two hundred fifty dollars ($250) for each site at which fireworks shall be sold. Each location shall be required to charge sales tax at the current rate imposed on retailers in KRS 139.200;
      (4) Any person, firm, co-partnership, nonprofit, or corporation intending to sell consumer fireworks, as defined in KRS 227.702(2) and (3) as the primary source of business, that is not a seasonal retailer as defined in subsection (3) of this section, shall register with the state fire marshal, who may assess a fee of no more than five hundred dollars ($500) for each site at which fireworks will be sold. Each location shall be required to charge sales tax at the current rate imposed on retailers in KRS 139.200;
      (5) The annual registration required by this section shall be received by the state fire marshal at least fifteen (15) days prior to offering fireworks for sale at the site for which the registration is intended. Evidence that a sales and use tax permit has been obtained from the Department of Revenue shall be presented to the state fire marshal as a condition of registration. If the registration is received less than fifteen (15) days prior to offering fireworks for
sale at the site for which registration is intended, an additional assessment of one hundred dollars ($100) shall be added to the initial fee;
      (6) Each site at which fireworks are offered for sale shall have its registration certificate displayed in a conspicuous location at the site;
      (7) Each site at which fireworks are offered for sale shall comply with all applicable provisions of the International Building Code, with Kentucky Amendments
(adopted edition), and NFPA 1124 (National Fire Protection Association) – Code for the Manufacture,
Transportation, Storage, and Retail Sales of Fireworks and Pyrotechnic Articles (adopted edition);
      (8) No person or business shall give, offer for sale, or sell any consumer fireworks listed in KRS 227.702 to any person under eighteen (18) years of age;
      (9) No person under eighteen (18) years of age may be employed by a fireworks distribution facility or manufacturing facility. No person under eighteen (18) years of age shall sell consumer fireworks at a consumer fireworks retail sales facility registered under this section unless the individual is supervised by a parent or guardian;
      (10) The state fire marshal may revoke the registration of any site which is in violation of a requirement of this section, or any other requirement provided pursuant to this chapter. If the violation renders any property especially susceptible to fire loss, and there is present such hazard to human life or limb that the public safety imperatively requires emergency action, the state fire marshal may take that action, as provided in KRS 227.330(6); and
      (11) A person lawfully possessing consumer fireworks, as defined in KRS 227.702(2) and (3) may use those items if:
      (a) He or she is at least eighteen (18) years of age;
      (b) Fireworks are not ignited within two hundred (200) feet of any structure, vehicle, or any other person; and
      (c) Use of the fireworks does not place him or her in violation of any lawfully enacted local ordinance.
227.750 Seizure and sale of fireworks stored and held in violation of chapter — Notice of proposed disposal of
fireworks required — Administrative hearing — KRS 227.700 to 227.750 not to conflict with local ordinances.
      (1) The state fire marshal, or any fire department having jurisdiction which has been deputized to act on behalf of the state fire marshal, shall cause to be removed at the expense of the owner all stocks of fireworks which are stored and held in violation of this chapter. After a period of sixty (60) days, the seized fireworks may be offered for sale by closed bid to a properly certified fireworks wholesaler.
      (2) After a period of sixty (60) days, the seized fireworks may be offered for sale by closed bid to a properly certified manufacturer, distributor, or wholesaler. All seized fireworks or explosives with a Class 1.3G or
      “Display” designation shall require the notification of the United States Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. The state fire marshal shall provide the owner or possessor a receipt containing the complete inventory of any fireworks seized within five (5) business days of the seizure.
      (3) Before any seized fireworks may be disposed of:
      (a) If the owner of the seized fireworks is known to the state fire marshal, the state fire marshal shall give notice by registered mail or personal service to the owner of the state fire marshal’s intention to dispose of the fireworks. The notice shall inform the owner of the state fire marshal’s intent. The state fire marshal shall conduct an administrative hearing in accordance with KRS Chapter 13B concerning the disposal of fireworks; or
      (b) If the identity of the owner of any seized fireworks is not known to the state fire marshal, the state fire marshal shall cause to be published, in a newspaper of general circulation in the county in which the seizure was made, notice of the seizure, and of the state fire marshal’s intention to dispose of the fireworks. The notice shall be published once each week for three (3) consecutive weeks. If no person claims ownership of the fireworks within ten (10) days of the date of the last publication, the state fire marshal may proceed with disposal of the fireworks. If the
owner does claim the fireworks within ten (10) days of the date of the last publication, a hearing as set out in paragraph (a) of this subsection shall be held
      (4) Nothing in KRS 227.700 to 227.750 shall restrict a local government from enacting ordinances that affect the sale or use of fireworks within its jurisdiction.
227.752 Storage of consumer fireworks, display fireworks, and theatrical pyrotechnic devices — Report to state fire
marshal and local fire chief required — Contents and time of filing of reports — Consequences of failure to submit a
report.
      (1) For the purposes of this section, “APA 87-1” means the latest document: Standard for Construction and Approval for Transportation of Fireworks, Novelties, and Theatrical Pyrotechnics written by the American
Pyrotechnic Association (APA).
      (2) The storage of consumer fireworks, display fireworks, or theatrical pyrotechnic devices, as defined in APA 87-1, at retail, wholesale, storage, or manufacturing facilities shall be reported in writing to the state fire marshal and the local fire chief of the jurisdiction where the facilities are located.
      (a) The report shall be completed by the owner or lessee of the property or the supplier of the fireworks, and shall include the address of the facility, the location of the fireworks to be stored, a copy of the shipping bill, and whether they are consumer fireworks, theatrical pyrotechnic devices, or display fireworks.
      (b) The initial report for permanent business establishments open year round shall be submitted between January 1, 2012, and January 31, 2012, for existing business and fifteen (15) days before storage begins for new businesses. The report for permanent business establishments open year round shall be updated annually and upon a change in location of the stored items.
      (3) Seasonal retailers, as defined in KRS 227.715, shall submit, at least fifteen (15) days prior to opening for sale each year, a report to the state fire marshal and the local fire chief of the jurisdiction identifying:
      (a) The address where the sales will be taking place;
      (b) The address where the fireworks will be stored; and
      (c) A description of how the fireworks will be stored. Only one (1) report is due if the seasonal retailer stores the same product at the same location for both the June 10 through July 7 and December 26 through January 4 seasons.
      (4) Failure to submit a report required under this section shall be cause to cease and desist operation of the facility or site until such time as the required information is properly submitted. Inspectors shall notify the permit holder in writing and may allow twenty-four (24) hours to remedy the violation, unless the violation poses a distinct fire hazard.